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Relational Growth Challenges are opportunities to influence your relationship for the better, with or without your partner's participation. Each exercise can help you deepen awareness and increase the positive impact you have on your connection.
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It Takes One to Tango

It only takes one person to change a marriage for the better. This can be a bitter pill to swallow. When it comes to change and personal growth, how much, when, where, and even whether our partners choose to change is their business. Pouring your own limited energy into blaming, demanding, criticizing, and complaining about your partner’s need to change will get you nowhere faster than . . .


The Receiving Gap

There's a hidden gap in our marriages. Like a hole in a bicycle tire, it's hard to see. We know something's off balance, the ride feels harder than it should be, but we don't know what's wrong. We ignore it, or blame someone, or just keep riding along until our relationship has gone completely flat. Over time, our inability to receive the love our partner offers us can reduce . . .


The Gift of Presence

During the holidays, being open and receptive to your partner can be challenging. There are more stressors than usual, both positive and negative, as well as emotions that surface, resurface and crystallize around giving, receiving, and being with or without family. Presence means slowing down enough to notice where you are, the people you’re with, and the situations y . . .


The Inner Concierge

For better or worse, our minds judge as a way of making sense of the world and of our own and others' place within it. This tendency to look at situations and people as good/bad, right/wrong, selfish/selfless can be quite evident in our closest relationships. When partnerships are dominated by this tendency to judge another person or their actions, precious time and energy get squandered feedi . . .


What Do You Expect?

Expectations within a marriage can be tricky, particularly as life's busyness encroaches on the time set aside for sharing and reflection. Unacknowledged expectations solidify into rigid identities and beliefs. Stopping to consider the expectations that have developed in a marriage related to roles, tasks and needs helps keep the connection honest and emotionally fertile, as well as inviting e . . .